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NEWS AND UPDATES

May 21, 2013
 
Generator at Carolina North now producing electricity from landfill methane gas
 
The first project completed at Carolina North sets the tone for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill campus meant to be a model of sustainability. This spring, an Army green, 1,000- kilowatt generator shipped here from Austria started turning a greenhouse gas into electricity for the local energy grid.
 
Landfill gas, largely methane, is produced by the breakdown of materials within buried waste. Unchecked, gas pressure builds within a landfill and ultimately releases into the atmosphere, contributing to pollution and global warming.
 
"We are grateful that we have been able to harness this greenhouse gas that is harmful to the atmosphere and convert it into energy that will eventually fuel the growth of Carolina North," Chancellor Holden Thorp said. "It's also a great example of how the University and local governments can work together for their mutual benefit."
 
Electricity generation is the latest stage in this joint project of the University and Orange County that began in 2009. That year, the two reached an agreement in which the University pays the county for the use of the gas and in turn receives carbon credits for reducing pollution. The total emissions reduction as a result of the project is equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions from 8,000 passenger vehicles.
 
The credits will help the campus honor the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment to be climate neutral by 2050. The project is one strategy in the 2009 Climate Action Plan to reduce UNC's carbon footprint to zero by 2050.
 
By November 2011, UNC had installed a network of pipes to collect the gas within the landfill and direct it to a flaring system. Burning waste methane, which is many times more potent than carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas, reduces pollution and global warming.

But with the 2012 installation of the pipeline into the heart of the Carolina North campus and the purchase of a generator, the landfill gas no longer has to be flared. Now it can be converted into electrical energy.

At first, the electricity generated will go back to the Duke Energy grid. Later, exhaust from the generator will be used heat buildings at Carolina North, recycling heat that would otherwise be wasted. 

"We're pleased recent regulatory and economic changes made gas recovery from small landfills feasible," said Barry Jacobs, chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners. "Clean energy projects like this are the sort of innovative ideas that public entities should be pursuing together."
 
UNC Energy Services contact: Phil Barner, (919) 966-4100, Philip.Barner@energy.unc.edu News Services contact: Susan Hudson, (919) 962-8415, susan_hudson@unc.edu
 

Update on greenway construction

 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

Heavy rains in June and July slowed the construction of the Carolina North greenway this summer. The greenway construction is now expected to be completed in the fall, after which the chain-link fences will be removed and the closed sections of the Pumpkin Loop reopened.

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News and Updates

Pumpkin Loop detours set up as work on greenway begins

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27, 2013 

Construction of the Carolina North greenway will begin the week of April 1, causing portions of the 2.5 mile Pumpkin Loop trail that cross the construction area to be closed for about four months for safety reasons. A rerouted, shorter (1.89 miles) Pumpkin Loop will be marked for use while the other portions are closed. Maps and other directional signs posted on site show detours around the closed sections and available alternate recreation routes. The parking lot at the trailhead will remain open, but trail users will no longer have access to the Pumpkin Loop from entrances at Orange County Human Services, the Seymour Senior Center and Chapel Ridge Apartments. Access points in the Glen Heights neighborhood and at the Municipal Drive entrance to the construction site as well as a portion of the Wormhole Trail used to access the Pumpkin Loop all will be posted “closed.”

  (See map at http://uncnews.unc.edu/images/stories/news/campus/2012/pumpkinloopmap.jpg  for more details.) Over the next four months, Carolina Conduit Systems construction crews will grade the path and pave a 10-foot-wide asphalt greenway along the same utility corridor that contains an underground ductbank. They will install a bolted-panel chain link fence on both sides of the corridor from the PSNC easement crossing to the south to Homestead Road to the north. Construction vehicles and heavy equipment will be using the corridor, including the sections that cross the Pumpkin Loop, to access the project. Runners, bikers and others who cross over fencing into the construction zone risk serious injury to themselves. The less disruption there is to the construction site, the quicker the greenway can be completed and the entire Pumpkin Loop reopened, construction supervisors said.  When completed this summer, the paved greenway will offer access to the forest to many unable or reluctant to use the current dirt and gravel trails: those in wheelchairs, parents pushing strollers, casual cyclists and children on skates or tricycles. The sides of the greenway will be landscaped with native plants and two granite and stone benches. The greenway will connect, eventually, to the planned Horace Williams Trail to the north and the proposed Campus-to-Campus Connector greenway to the south. For the latest information on trail use during the construction period, check the Carolina North Forest website (http://carolinanorthforest.unc.edu/ForestNews) or signs on site at the information kiosks and along the trails.  Map showing temporary trail closures: http://uncnews.unc.edu/images/stories/news/campus/2012/pumpkinloopmap.jpg  Facilities Planning contact: Masaya Konishi, (919) 843-5103,Masaya.Konishi@facilities.unc.edu Forest Management contact: Greg Kopsch, (919) 883-8930,  forestmanager@fac.unc.edu News Services contact: Susan Hudson, (919) 962-8415,  susan_hudson@unc.edu

Conservation areas monitor to be introduced at Carolina North public meeting

Local residents can meet the new monitor for Carolina North’s conservation areas at a public information meeting Jan. 30 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 Representatives from the Triangle Land Conservancy will be available to discuss the group’s role as third-party monitor at a meeting to be held from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Magnolia Conference Room of the Giles F. Horney Building, 103 Airport Drive. Free parking is available, and Chapel Hill Transit serves the building via the NU bus route.

 Carolina North is being developed as a mixed-use academic campus on University-owned property along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, two miles north of the main campus. Most of the planned construction for Carolina North will take place on or near the site of the Horace Williams Airport. This meeting is one of a series of regular presentations to keep the public updated on activities at Carolina North.

 Much of the Jan. 30 meeting will focus on the conservation areas, tracts outside the development area to be preserved for their ecological value. UNC staff will present the signs used to designate the areas and the land stewardship policy that guides UNC’s management of the property. They will also introduce representatives from the nonprofit Triangle Land Conservancy, selected by the University to ensure adherence to the conservation areas’ restrictive covenants.

 

Horace Williams Airport runway to close temporarily after Thanksgiving weekend

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2012

The runway at Horace Williams Airport will be closed Nov. 26 through Jan.1, 2013, for construction of a utilities ductbank and to make borings for soil samples.

During that period, planes will not be allowed to take off or land at the airport.

The Federal Aviation Administration approved the temporary closure earlier this month, and plane owners based at the airport were notified by certified letter in August.

The ductbank being installed will carry electrical and fiberoptic lines below ground from Homestead Road to buildings along Airport Drive that are owned by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The ductbank will decrease interruptions in service because of weather conditions and increase the reliability of electrical power at the Giles Horney complex and the Administrative Office Building, where critical administrative functions are housed.

Additional soil borings related to the Carolina North project also will be completed during this period. These borings will provide geotechnical information about the former municipal landfill site that is needed for construction planning at Carolina North.

The airport itself will not be closed. Staff will be working normal hours, the parking lot will be fully accessible, and aircraft that remain on site will be accessible to owners during the runway closure period.

News Services contact: Susan Hudson, (919) 962-8415, susan_hudson@unc.edu

Unpaved section of Municipal Drive to be closed Nov. 19-21

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2012

Municipal Drive off Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in Chapel Hill will be blocked Monday through Wednesday (Nov. 19-21) for installation of the landfill gas pipeline crossing the unpaved portion of Municipal Drive.

The closure means that no vehicles, bicyclists or pedestrians will be allowed access to the main parking and trail access area at Carolina North Forest for those three days.

 Municipal Drive and the trailhead at the Locust Lot parking area will reopen to the public on Thanksgiving Day.

This construction is part of the last phase of the landfill gas recovery project, a joint endeavor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Orange County.

The eight-inch diameter, high-density polyethylene, low-pressure gas pipeline will eventually connect the collection system at the Orange County Landfill to an electrical generator at Carolina North. Heat from the generator will be used to help heat the first buildings on the new campus.

News Services contact: Susan Hudson,   (919) 962-8415, susan_hudson@unc.edu

Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012

Pumpkin Loop to open for Saturday’s Pumpkin Run and again in December The popular Pumpkin Loop trail in the Carolina North Forest will be open for the annual Pumpkin Run on Saturday, Oct. 27. After the race weekend, the loop will be closed again for installation of a landfill gas pipeline, but will reopen in December and will remain open until construction begins on the Carolina North greenway, currently scheduled for late winter 2013. The Pumpkin Loop has been closed since June to allow construction crews to install a utility ductbank and landfill gas pipeline through the property owned by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For the Pumpkin Run weekend, construction fences blocking access to the trail will be removed temporarily and the crossings resurfaced with Chapel Hill gravel. In a related project, Municipal Drive will be blocked and the trailhead at the Locust Lot parking area at Carolina North Forest will be closed for three days sometime in the next four weeks for installation of the landfill gas pipeline crossing the unpaved portion of Municipal Drive. No vehicles, bicyclists or pedestrians will be allowed access to the unpaved portion of Municipal Drive for those three days. The specific dates for the construction have not been decided, but will be posted before the closures on the Carolina North Forest Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Carolina-North-Forest/179464238759273) and the Carolina North website (carolinanorth.unc.edu) as well as on site. News Services contact: Susan Hudson, (919) 962-8415, susan_hudson@unc.edu

Public information meeting about 2012 Carolina North Annual Report set for Sept. 10

A public information meeting will be held at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, to receive comments and feedback on the Carolina North Development Agreement Annual Report to the Town of Chapel Hill. The meeting will be held in the Council Chamber of Town Hall, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Carolina North is envisioned as a mixed-use academic campus on university-owned property along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, two miles north of the main campus. University and Town representatives signed a development agreement in 2009 that covers the first 20 years of development on the site. The agreement contains guidelines and standards for the development of the first 3 million square feet of a mixed-use research and academic campus on 133 acres.

The annual report lets the Town and public know what development activities have occurred on the Carolina North site in the past year and the ways in which the University is complying with the terms of the development agreement. The report is part of the structure established by the agreement for providing continued town-gown communication. The report will be posted online at http://www.townofchapelhill.org/carolinanorth .   It is also posted on this site:  http://carolinanorth.unc.edu/Portals/CarolinaNorth/Documents/pdfLarge/12-2865-RED-2012%20Carolina%20North%20Annual%20Report.pdf

Town Manager Roger Stancil will review the report and the public input before reporting on Sept. 24 to the Town Council on his review of the development agreement and its requirements.

Public input is welcome. Send comments about the annual report or other issues related to Carolina North at any time to  carolinanorth@townofchapelhill.org  or write Town of Chapel Hill Planning Department, Carolina North, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill, NC 27514.

Detailed information is available online at http://www.townofchapelhill.org/index.aspx?page=900  and http://carolinanorth.unc.edu/  To be added to a mailing list to receive regular updates about the Carolina North development agreement, please contact info@townofchapelhill.org

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Public invited to attend information meeting on activities at Carolina North Staff members at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will update local residents, faculty, staff and students on activities at Carolina North at a public information meeting June 27. The meeting will take place from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the Magnolia Conference Room of the Giles F. Horney Building at 103 Airport Drive. Free parking is available, and Chapel Hill Transit serves the building via the NU route. Carolina North is being developed as a mixed-use academic campus on University-owned property along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, two miles north of the main campus. Most of the planned construction for Carolina North will take place on or near the site of the Horace Williams Airport. Topics for the June 27 meeting will include updates on the construction of a utilities ductbank, installation of a landfill gas pipeline and generator, and designs of a greenway, the Collaborative Science Building and related infrastructure. UNC staff will also discuss an upcoming remediation study, to be done with the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources, of the former municipal landfill on the site. The study, the landfill remediation and a change in the route for the greenway will require additional minor tree cutting on the site, which will also be discussed. Another topic will be the approved modified conservation areas, the survey and marking of their boundaries and the search for a third-party monitor to ensure adherence to the conservation areas’ restrictive covenants.

Staff members will also review the recently completed periodic assessment of the Carolina North Development Agreement, the July 2009 contract between the University and the Town of Chapel Hill that covers the first 20 years of development of Carolina North. Town and University staff prepared this first assessment, and it is available at www.townofchapelhill.org/carolinanorth

Website: http://carolinanorth.unc.edu/ News Services contact: Susan Hudson, (919) 962-8415, susan_hudson@unc.edu

 

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Portions of Pumpkin Loop closed temporarily for ductbank construction

Construction has begun on the second phase of the utility ductbank across Carolina North, causing portions of the Pumpkin Loop running trail that cross the construction area to be closed temporarily for safety reasons. Pumpkin Loop access is closed at Orange County Human Services, the Seymour Center and Chapel Ridge Apartments as well as at access points in the Glenn Heights neighborhood and at the Municipal Drive construction staging area. A portion of the Wormhole Trail used to access the Pumpkin Loop in the vicinity of the ductbank project is also closed. (See map at

http://uncnews.unc.edu/images/stories/news/campus/2012/pumpkinloopmap.jpg for more details.)

Trail users should respect the erosion control and other fencing and keep out of these closed sections for their own safety and the safety of others. Maps and other directional signs posted on site show detours around the closed sections and available alternate recreation routes. Over the next six months, Carolina Conduit Systems construction crews will install the ductbank that will eventually provide service to the complex of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill buildings along Airport Drive. Construction vehicles and heavy equipment will be using the cleared corridor, including the sections that cross the Pumpkin Loop, to access the project. Runners, bikers and others who cross over fencing into the construction zone risk serious injury to themselves. These sections of the Pumpkin Loop will remain closed until late fall or early winter, but will be opened for the annual Pumpkin Run in October. For the latest information on trail use during the construction period, check the Carolina North Forest Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Carolina-North-Forest/179464238759273) or signs on site at the information kiosks and along the trails. Map showing temporary trail closures:

http://uncnews.unc.edu/images/stories/news/campus/2012/pumpkinloopmap.jpg Facilities Planning contact: Masaya Konishi, (919) 843-5103, Masaya.Konishi@facilities.unc.edu Forest Management contact: Greg Kopsch, (919) 883-8930, forestmanager@fac.unc.edu News Services contact: Susan Hudson, (919) 962-8415, susan_hudson@unc.edu

 

May 24, 2012

Second phase of ductbank project across Carolina North to begin next week

Weather permitting, construction will begin Tuesday (May 29) on the second phase of the utility ductbank that will eventually provide service to the complex of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill buildings along Airport Drive. The ductbank will provide more reliable power to the Giles Horney Building Complex and the Administrative Office Building. A greenway will be built on top of the ductbank when construction is complete.

Over the next six months, Carolina Conduit Systems construction crews will install the ductbank in the cleared corridor on UNC’s Carolina North property. The work will start at the PSNC natural gas line easement and go north toward Homestead Road. South of the PSNC easement, overhead electricity lines will be installed temporarily across the former municipal landfill while UNC staff and consultants continue the geotechnical investigation of that site.

This phase of the construction project will come closest to the southwest corner of the Glen Heights community. Construction vehicles will access the site from the south, using the cleared corridor. The ductbank route also crosses the Pumpkin Loop running trail at Carolina North Forest several times. Signs will be posted to inform trail users of the upcoming construction.

Facilities Planning contact: Diane Gillis, (919) 962-8198, Diane.Gillis@facilities.unc.edu

News Services contact: Susan Hudson, (919) 962-8415, susan_hudson@unc.edu

May 11, 2012

Town, University schedule public information meeting May 22 on development agreement

A public information meeting on the Carolina North Development Agreement will be held at 5:15 p.m. Tuesday, May 22, in the Council Chambers of Town Hall, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.A development agreement for UNC-Chapel Hill's Carolina North Campus was approved in June 2009. It contains guidelines and standards for the development of the first 3 million square feet of a mixed-use research and academic campus on 133 acres. Planning for the first project, the Collaborative Science Building, is under way. The early development at Carolina North will be accessed from Estes Drive Extension and a re-aligned Airport Drive.The agreement also contains guidelines for the rest of the property that will not be developed in the near future.The development agreement requires that the Town and University do a periodic assessment of the overall effectiveness of the development agreement. This first assessment must be completed within three years of the agreement, which is June 30, 2012. Town and University staff have prepared the assessment, and it is available at www.townofchapelhill.org/carolinanorth. Town Manager Roger L. Stancil will review the assessment and public input before reporting to the Town Council on his review of the development agreement and its requirements.Public input is welcome. Comments also may be made at the May 22 meeting or emailed to carolinanorth@townofchapelhill.org. Detailed information is available online at http://www.townofchapelhill.org/index.aspx?page=900 and http://carolinanorth.unc.edu/. To be added to a mailing list to receive regular updates about the Carolina North development agreement, please contact info@townofchapelhill.org

 

 

March 12, 2012

UNC has set aside three large areas of ecologically valuable land for conservation on the Carolina North site. To determine the legal boundaries of the areas and to mark them, survey crews will be working on the site for about six to eight weeks, beginning March 21. The surveyors may need to remove underbrush alongside the conservation areas to establish a clear line of sight. Vegetation removal will be kept to a minimum and will not occur without specific guidance from University staff on site.

 

 

February 10, 2012

Town Manager approves minor modification

In a Feb. 10 letter, Chapel Hill Town Manager Roger Stancil approved a minor modification to the Carolina North Development agreement that allows for the realignment of 311 acres of conservation areas. Read the text of the letter and an accompanying table here:

Letter

The realignment of the conservation areas was based on staff and consultants’ earlier study of the features of the land and discussion of the ecology of the site in workshops with faculty members. The change improves the ecological value and connectivity of the conservation areas by consolidating them to protect larger continuous tracts, preserve more mature forests, protect additional streams, wetlands and wildlife corridors, and eliminate areas such as the landfill that ought to be restored rather than conserved.

 

Feb. 16, 2012

Carolina North off to a slow start

The Daily Tar Heel

UNC is ready to break ground in June 2013 on the first building at Carolina North — a project expected to dominate construction at the University for the next 50 years.

But a lack of funding has repeatedly delayed development on the University’s first satellite campus. And though the University has devised a way to pay for one building, it hasn’t found a way to fund the rest of its plans for the site.

Read more:

http://www.dailytarheel.com/index.php/article/2012/02/carolina_north_0216

Feb. 7, 2012

Start of a new year brings flurry of Carolina North presentations

A new southern entrance to Carolina North will be created at the intersection of Estes Drive and a realigned Airport Drive. This southern entrance is closer to the site for the Research Building, on a portion of the current Horace Williams Airport.

The Chapel Hill and Carrboro communities got several opportunities last month to find out more about what’s happening at Carolina North right now as well as to take a peek at what it could look like in 50 years.Read more:

http://gazette.unc.edu/2012/02/07/start-of-a-new-year-brings-flurry-of-carolina-north-presentations/

 

UNC contributes to Chapel Hill 2020 process

 

UNC-Chapel Hill supports Chapel Hill 2020, the public process launched by the Town of Chapel Hill to seek input from the people who live, work, play and invest here to help create the town’s new comprehensive plan.

This week, Bruce Runberg, associate vice chancellor for facilities planning and construction, and Anna Wu, director of facilities planning, presented “Carolina North and Chapel Hill 2020” at Town Hall. You can watch and read more about that session at

http://www.townofchapelhill.org/index.aspx?page=1850

The presentation is also posted here: 

Presentation

Last weekend, Chancellor Holden Thorp spoke at an “unconference,” a free-form participatory meeting favored by the techie set, as part of an event co-sponsored by the University to attract more student input for the town’s process from on campus.

 “A lot of innovative, creative people want to be in college towns,” Thorp said. “But we can’t create the environment we want unless Chapel Hill has all the attributes that those folks want.”

 The Chapel Hill 2020 process will continue through April, with many opportunities to participate, in person or online. Here are the next available opportunities:

Feb. 2-March 1, 7-8:30 p.m. Thursdays, Tavern Talks,

http://www.townofchapelhill.org/index.aspx?page=22&recordid=4461&returnURL=%2findex.aspx

 Feb. 7, 7 p.m., Chapel Hill High School, reporting out session on progress so far 

www.2020buzz.org , blog with links to surveys, reports and calendars

 

 

www.chapelhill2020.org, Town web page with information on the process and how to participate.

 

Jan. 25, 2012

 

 The 2020 plan, partnership

 

http://www.chapelhillnews.com/2012/01/25/69576/the-2020-plan-partnership.html

The Chapel Hill News (guest column)

UNC and the Town of Chapel Hill were created at the same time, for each other's mutual benefit, more than two centuries ago.

Jan. 23, 2012:

UNC campus progressing The News & Observer (Raleigh)

UNC-Chapel Hill officials hope to begin construction on the first building at the Carolina North satellite campus early next year. A lot of things will have to fall neatly into place for the university to meet that schedule, said Bruce Runberg, associate vice chancellor for facilities planning.

Carolina North to replace Horace Williams Airport

http://www.dailytarheel.com/index.php/article/2012/01/carolina_north_to_replace_airport:

The Daily Tar Heel

Horace Williams Airport will soon close, but academic innovation is scheduled to take flight with the construction of Carolina North early next year.

Jan. 20, 2012

 UNC wants to proceed with Carolina North

 

http://www.dailytarheel.com/index.php/article/2012/01/unc_wants_to_proceed_with_carolina_north

The Daily Tar Heel

The University is moving forward with plans for Carolina North, a research campus that was endorsed six years ago but delayed due to budget constraints.

Ground Could Break Next Year On Carolina North

http://www.chapelboro.com/Ground-Could-Break-Next-Year-On-Carolina-North/12051280

WCHL

After more than 10 years of planning, ground could break for

Carolina North 

early next year. 

 

More than 50 people crammed in to a small conference room at UNC’s Giles F. Horney building to hear the latest on Carolina North. Associate Vice Chancellor of

Facilities Planning and Construction 

Bruce Runberg and facilities planning director Anna Wu gave a presentation and answered questions about the project's status.

Jan. 18, 2012

Carolina North Meeting To Provide Development Updates ThursdayWCHL 1360-AM (Chapel Hill)

UNC is inviting members of the public to attend a meeting this week to learn about the latest updates on the development of Carolina North. The event will include the discussion of topics of construction of the utilities duct bank, inclusion of a methane gas pipeline and the design of a greenway.

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill invites local residents, faculty, staff and students to attend a Jan. 19 public meeting for updates on activities at the Carolina North site.The meeting will begin at 5:30 p.m. in the Magnolia Conference Room of the Giles F. Horney Building at 103 Airport Drive. Free parking is available, and Chapel Hill Transit serves the building via the NU route.Carolina North is being developed as a mixed-use academic campus on University-owned property along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, two miles north of the main campus. Most of the planned construction for Carolina North will take place on or near the site of the Horace Williams Airport.Topics for the Jan. 19 meeting will include the construction of a utilities ductbank, inclusion of a methane gas pipeline and design of a greenway in that utilities corridor and the design of a Research Building as the first building to be constructed at Carolina North.Another major topic will be a proposed minor modification of conservation areas as described in the Carolina North Development Agreement, the July 2009 contract between the University and the Town of Chapel Hill that covers the first 20 years of development of Carolina North. The agreement includes the designation of 311 acres of the property for conservation. After fieldwork done to identify the features of the conservation areas and broader discussions on campus, University staff looked at ways to reshape the 311 acres to improve the ecological value of the conservation areas. The resulting modification consolidated some of the areas and extended others so they would meet, making it possible to preserve older, more mature forest and protect additional stream, stream buffer and wildlife corridors in the same amount of acreage.The University first presented the proposal informally at a Town Council meeting Oct. 26 and has now formally submitted the minor modification to Town Manager Roger Stancil, who will review it.News Services contact: Susan Hudson, (919) 962-8415, susan_hudson@unc.edu

Ductbank Update #5

Nov. 18, 2011

·  Geotechnical borings for infrastructure design have been completed

·   Repair work to fencing on site will continue.

·  ‘Wormhole’ trail has been re-opened      

Please keep watching for postings about trail rerouting.

Ductbank Update #4

Nov. 11, 2011·    Clearing work in the corridor has been completed.·    Reseeding has been done to stabilize the soil in the corridor.·    Drilling will continue as part of the geotechnical borings for designing the infrastructure.·    Please keep watching for postings about trail rerouting.

Ductbank Update #3

October 31, 2011

· Tree felling in the corridor is complete.

· Today (Monday) dump truck arrives to haul clearing debris.

· Hauling debris will continue through Thursday (Nov. 3).

Ductbank Update #2

October 20, 2011

· Tree clearing will begin October 21, 2011 starting at the blue gate and going north.

· An air horn will sound just before each tree is felled.· Please respect on-trail advisories for your own safety and the safety of others.

  

Trees identified for protection and native plants salvaged before corridor clearing

October 14, 2011

As work crews prepare for the clearing of a utility corridor for the installation of a ductbank through Carolina North property, University staff members have walked the route of the corridor and on Oct. 4 tagged with pink tape the trees to be saved near the edges where possible. N.C. Botanical Garden employees today (Oct. 14) are salvaging smaller native plants within the corridor before clearing begins.

Work crews have installed two types of fencing along the edges of the corridor. The black silt fencing contains erosion during clearing, while the bright orange fencing indicates the boundaries of the corridor. Trees outside the orange fencing will not be cut.The corridor is being cleared for the construction of an underground ductbank for electrical and telecommunication cables to provide greater service reliability for UNC buildings along Airport Drive, including the Administrative Office Building and the Giles Horney complex.

The clearing of the corridor and the ductbank construction will cause some of the walking and biking trails in the Carolina North Forest to be rerouted temporarily. Trail users should check the Carolina North Forest Management Facebook page (http://tinyurl.com/4484tgz) for the latest information about the status of trails during the project. Forest Management staff will also post updates at information kiosks on site and advisories along the trails.

· Access to the trail system will continue to be available to the public.

· Forest Management is still expecting to host the annual Pumpkin Run in October 2011 and October 2012.

· No permanent trail re-routes, closures, rehabilitation or re-vegetation of the Pumpkin Loop will begin until after the construction of the ductbank and greenway path.

· The plans and resources for rehabilitation and re-vegetation of the Pumpkin Loop are in addition to the stabilization/replanting required as part of the ductbank scope-of-work.

· We will continue to discuss the restoration plans for the existing gravel road known as the Pumpkin Loop.

Questions and Answers from September 13th Public Meeting

September 14, 2011

 

Read the responses to questions posed at the September 13th meeting. See also David Hart's article on the ductbank project in the Chapel Hill News.

Preparation for Ductbank, Future Greenway at Carolina North To Begin

September 9, 2011

 

In early October, work crews will begin to remove trees, brush and other vegetation in a narrow corridor from the Horace Williams Airport to Homestead Rd. Click here to read the project press release.

Carolina North Annual Reports for 2010 and 2011 Now Available

September 9, 2011

The Carolina North Development Agreement Annual Reports for 2010 and 2011 are now available for online viewing.

UNC responds to public comments received by Army Corps of Engineers

July 5, 2011

In the latest stage of the application process that addresses stream and wetland impacts at the Carolina North site, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill responded June 29, 2011, to citizen and state agency comments received about the application by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  The Corps’ May 31, 2011, summary of the comments received during the 30-day public comment period, the individual citizen and state agency comments, and the University’s response are available through these links.

More...

Individual Permit Application for Carolina North accepted by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

April 12, 2011

Public comment period now through May 9

In January 2011, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill submitted an application for a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Individual Permit, and a 401 Water Quality Certification from the N.C. Division of Water Quality, for the Carolina North development. The application addresses stream and wetland impacts at the site.

After submittal, the Corps made two requests for additional information. The university responded with the required ainformation. The application posted on this website has been updated with this additional information, and the two ACE requests for additional information and the university's responses are also included as separate items, January 18, 2011, ACE notice and UNC-CH response, and February 24, 2011, ACE notice and UNC-CH response. The complete application is available as one PDF as well as divided into text and appendices (below).

The Corps has deemed the application complete and has issued a 30-day Public Notice, April 8-May 9, 2011. During this time, the Corps will accept comments from the public and consider them in the evaluation of the application. The Corps Public Notice information is available at http://www.saw.usace.army.mil/Wetlands/Notices/Current_notices.html.

Individual Permit introductory text

Appendix A

Appendix B

Appendix C

Appendix D

Appendix E

Appendix F

Appendix G

Appendix H

Appendix I

Appendix J

Appendix K

Appendix L

Appendix M

Appendix N

Appendix O

Appendix P

Appendix Q

Appendix R

Individual Permit Application for Carolina North submitted to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

January 7, 2011

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has submitted the Individual Permit Application required by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers before development at Carolina North. The application addresses stream and wetland impacts at the site. If the application is deemed complete, the Corps will issue a public notice on Jan. 19 for 30 days.  If the application is not complete, the Corps will request additional information and issue the notice after receiving it. The public is invited to review an electronic version of the application. The complete application is available as one PDF as well as divided into text and appendices.

Public presentation of Carolina North stream and wetland impacts given at Nov. 16 meeting

November 23, 2010

The presentation given by Jack Evans, Carolina North executive director, may be seen here. The presentation given by Andy Williams of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is available here. The public also is invited to review an electronic version of the draft application. 

Comments and questions from the public information meeting will be considered as the University completes its application for submission to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by the end of this calendar year.

Public invited to review permit application online, attend Nov. 16 meeting on Carolina North stream and wetland impacts

November 2, 2010

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill invites local residents, faculty, staff and students to attend a Nov. 16 public meeting to explain the permitting process required by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers before development at Carolina North.

The public also is invited to review an electronic version of the draft application. The complete application is available as one PDF as well as divided into text and appendices.

The Nov. 16 meeting will begin at 5:15 p.m. in the large basement conference room of the Chapel Hill Public Library,100 Library Drive. Free parking is available, and Chapel Hill Transit serves the library via the D route.

A representative from the Army Corps of Engineers will attend the meeting and be available to explain the permitting process and how the public may participate. Attendees will have opportunities to ask questions and share comments.

Annual Report

September 2, 2010

On Sept. 1, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill presented the Town of Chapel Hill and the Town Manager the first Annual Report required under the Carolina North Development Agreement, approved in June 2009. That report is also available to the public on this website. This first Carolina North Annual Report is relatively short. No ground has been broken on the site this year, but University staff have been actively engaged in preparations for the future. Although the current downturn in the economy has delayed early development at Carolina North, these delays have done nothing to diminish the eventual role that Carolina North will play in support of the University’s mission. 

Carolina North Development Agreement: Annual Report

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